Friday, April 8, 2011

Fashion Show Review - the "secret" position teacher took where all amateur designers don't know about.


My lovely diverse students (me on the right)
I received an invitation earlier from my loving fashion student to attend their fashion show. I believed personally, an invitation should be properly send, meaning in a letter with a card, or a friendly email, definitely not publicly in Facebook. But I understand it's a student's fashion show. Upon agreeing to attend the fashion show, I already have the expectation that this won't match the other more experienced fashion shows I've been before.

Here's the "English" teacher...
It was a rainy day, but I arrived earlier at the venue and avoided the downpour - to be warmly received by a few of my students. Notice I mentioned only a few of my students approached me to talk with me, while the others were looking at me, kinda surprised to receive my presence. I got a bit shy and self-conscious seeing my students dressed up (mostly in black). A few I heard mentioned "Here's the English teacher". I laughed secretly inside, for the headmistress must have "advertised" me a bit wrongly for I presented myself to her specifically as a Communications Coach. I understand that most of her students are not educated in the English language, hence the title.

Ripe Fruits for the Plucking
Turn on my eyes, ears and mind
In a fashion event like this, I must not be too critical, for the sake of my fashion student's learning level, which I assumed must be still amateur at this level. Of course to be fair, some of the students whom I've personally got acquainted has already opened boutiques of their own. For their sake, when I see a piece of fashion, I will judge the fashion at the most basic level - wearability, aesthetics value and communication. Wearability here means how comfortable it is to put on and take off. Aestehetics value means the artistic design and the elements used for the dress. Finally, communication means the feeling or message it gives when the person seeing that piece of fashion. Now, the theme is Spring/Summer, but as one of the student told me that the rule has sort of flunked out due to some creative differences, some of the designs I will encounter will not follow exactly as the overall theme.

Fierce purple but below is a like a snake just shed its skin?
Strategic location for teacher to spot mistakes
Took my seat at the centre corner of audience section, but its places only at left side of the stage. The side is usually where the "mistakes" are visible, hence is where a clever teacher will sit. The other side has no seats whatsoever, and is open for the passers-by at the mall. Many of my pictures will only get the side view of the models and the designers. The show was late for a few minutes. The music for the opening could be better, for there are many separated tracks in between and not timed at all for each of the models entry and exit.

Emcee of the show
The emcee, I assumed, must have been instructed by the headmistress to advertise about the school, in which he did. It gives the whole fashion show a kind of sales presentation to the public who stopped to watch. I wish the emcee would stress and be more "lively", rather the more straighforward talk. I understand he has certain messages that need to be relayed - like the school's accreditation and affiliations. If he could, he should inject more tonality in his articulation, so as to keep the audience attention sustained, since the actual fashion show also fights for the attention as well.

The runway hits and misses
Now comes the runway. Due to space constraints, the length of the runway is not long. At the side, it has a platform that serves as some kind of pedestal for the model to stop and pose for the cameras. About the models, since the runway is not long, their walk were basically basic, to say the least. Not much playing around with the dress or showcasing them in elaborate manner. I noticed when a model were standing at the tall pedestal, I could almost see her poochie and slight hair on her armpits. Good idea to have such pedestal? Questionable again.

Skirts Redefined - An Analysis of what works, and what can be improved upon

Wearability: 7/10
Aesthetics: 4/10
Communication: I'm going to dance but my skirt will fly when i shake my booty. This is the example when the models stood on the pedestal, their poochie and underarm hair can be seen if unaware. I just hope the top covers the shoulders, then it will more like a fun girl day's out. Or else these 2 dresses just spell s-l- (u know the rest).






Wearability: 8/10
Aesthetics: 7/10
Communication: My bottom is a swan, but my top ain't tight. The top should be knit much tighter so as when viewed from the side (where a lot of mistakes are visible), the skin underarms are not left untidy. I love the bottom part of the dress, for it really moves and give the feeling of a swan princess.







Wearability:5/10
Aesthetics: 7/10
Communication: I'm a court jester below, a sex vixen on top. I understand the concept of the bubble skirt. I'm kinda worried what happen when she decides to sit? Will the bottom part of her skirt goes flat? I love the top, with lace peeping through. But somehow the total look of the dress needs to be more cohesive. And the colour black is not suitable, for its neither telling me its fun or death is a joke. More colours could perhaps save this piece.



Wearability: 8/10
Aesthetics: 7/10
Communication: I'm simple, breezy, safe and only slightly out of the ordinary. This piece is taking the safe route. I understand to be a great designer, it needs to be edgy, make it stand out. I only wish the designs could go further, developing more on the idea. Or else, these 2 could be just another ordinary dresses.



Wearability: 8/10
Aesthetics: 6/10
Communication: I'm soft and blue, but sometimes goes cuckoo. I love the headpiece (like a bird's nest), very beautifully done. Love the blue, except I'm trying to understand the touch of pink and gauzy blue (again?). The back and front of the dress is presentable. But again, the side? More thought need to make it more cohesive as a look.






Wearability: 6/10
Aesthetics: 6/10
Communication: I'm a fusion flower of Rafflesia and hibiscus, touch me to love or die. An extremely eye-catching piece when it comes onto stage. My only concern is the designer focus too much on the top part. If you look at the bottom part, there's basically no continuity. Again, another case of half-baked concept. But good try for showmanship.





Wearability: 8/10
Aesthetics: 8/10
Communication: I'm a lady. This is an interesting piece that looks almost well-done. It's pleasing to the figure, but what happens if the lady is slightly more meaty?








Wearability: 8/10
Aesthetics: 8/10
Communication: Ice royalty. This dress is almost "perfect", from head to toe? But for today's woman? I just hope it has more shape at the bottom part, instead of the drape just drop to the feet. More work can be done to make the bottom part work.








Wearability: 7/10
Aesthetics: 6/10
Communication: My butt is big. Glaring mistake here. If a woman were to wear a dress that accentuates her booty, then this dress would be perfect for her. Bear in mind, bright colours like blue usually enlarges a shape.







Wearability: 7/10
Aesthetics: 6/10
Communication: I'm a muslimah. This piece suits for more religious undertones. I rather the designer try a more brighter, happier colour - to balance the seriousness of the message the piece is conveying.


Wearability:7/10
Aesthetics: 6/10
Communication: I'm a pricess from purple galaxy. The side you can see holds through her arms and the shoulder cum breastplace looks like she's ready for battle. Sensible design elements need to be considered. Should also ask - why do I need to layer my skirt with draping after draping?





And finally, we have the men. It's funny that the men's wear only have 1 student who are willing to do? How come there aren't any student who venture into men's wear? Personally, I felt it's just filling the "quota" for a show, that if they were going to feature men's wear, should at least have more of it, rather than reserve it for the last?






Opportunities are few, cherish everyone of it ... but how?
All in all, I hope my dear students learn to take whatever comments in good faith. A fashion designer is very much similar to an actor. Both works are presented to the public and media, both are judged and being commented. Like what I taught my students through my Artiste Training Course, they should utilise the media to their advantage, don't run away from them. They should be thankful that their work is even featured in anyone's blog or news website, for it's publicity. A good fashion designer will learn to embrace the limelight. Unfortunately, at the end of the show, one of my students decided to go home immediately, in which I quickly stopped her, and advised her to go back to the show (even when it's over), and mingle in the crowd. There were photographers and journalists everywhere! (as shown in the pic) But she has yet to have the courage to do so. Perhaps she should take my Artiste Training Course. What a golden opportunity that goes to waste. But sometimes human are unsure of HOW to approach in situations such as this. It's perfectly understandable. But again, how many times would u have such a spotlight? Think about it.